Original 7 Wonders of the World

Although the list sees a change, the Seven Wonders of the World today are very different from the seven that were initially listed. Check out the original seven wonders of the world.

Seven Original Wonders of the World

Pyramids of Giza

The Great Pyramids of Giza

The Great Pyramids of Giza

Cutting right to the chase, imagine 2 million blocks of stone used over 20 years by 20,000 men, all to complete the Giza, which is basically a tomb for Pharoah Khufu who reigned in the fourth century. Also, imagine this happening in 2560 B.C. That’s what makes the Giza a true wonder. At 13 acres, scholars still can’t believe how accurate the square is, as each side faces the four exact points of the compass. All this at a time where there was no electricity or machines! The Unfinished Chamber, the Queen’s Chamber and the King’s Chamber are recent discoveries made under the Giza. Read more about Pyramids of Giza here.

Hanging Gardens of Babylon

Hanging Gardens of Babylon

Hanging Gardens of Babylon

It’s touted as being the centerpiece of Babylon, the ancient city that used to sit 50 miles south of modern Baghdad. You may not find mention of it in the history books, but stories abound on the hanging gardens saying how King Nebudchadnezzar II built them in the 7th century B.C. He did it to remind his wife of her homeland, Medina.

Statue of Zeus at Olympia

Statue of Zeus at Olympia

Statue of Zeus at Olympia

Ivory and gold goes into the construction of this 40 foot wonder, standing inside the Temple of Olympia whose ruins are situated on modern Greece’s west coast. The Greek sculptor Pheidias is responsible for its making in 435 B.C. Built to honor Zeus at the time the Olympic games were held, it’s been there 800 years. Whether it was fire or a transfer, this wonder is no longer at the Temple.

The Temple of Artemis

 

The Temple of Artemis

The Temple of Artemis

Cherisphron, an architect, had constructed this edifice in 550 B.C. at Ephesus (modern Turkey). It’s made completely of marble and honors Artemis, the Greek goddess of hunting and fertility. Other talented sculptors had a hand in making the bronze statues that grace the temple’s façade. It overlooks what seems to be a courtyard but was once a marketplace. At 60 feet, 127 Ionic columns surround the marble structure. The primary building was burnt down by Herostatus on July 21, 256 B.C. (the night Alexander the Great was born). Later, the Goths burned the temple that was built over the old one.

Mausoleum at Halicarnassus

Mausoleum at Halicarnassus

Mausoleum at Halicarnassus

Halicarnassus, near modern Bodrum in Turkey, hosts this lovely wonder, acting as a tomb for Mausollos of Caria, the Persian King. It was actually done a few years after his death, in 35 B.C. With a height of 140 feet and a base of about 12,000 square feet, this marvel stood intact for 16 centuries until an earthquake damaged it and the 15th century saw to crusaders destroying what remained.

Colossus of Rhodes

Colossus of Rhodes

Colossus of Rhodes

294 B.C. saw to the people of Rhodes commissioning sculptor Chares of Lindos to make the Colossus, which is basically a bronze statue modeled after Helios the Sun God (their patron deity). At 110 feet, it overlooks the harbor that once stood on Rhode Island. But fifty-six years later, in 238 B.C., an earthquake claimed the Colossus and left it in ruins. According to lore, in 652, invading Arabs took and sold the pieces to a Syrian Jew who purportedly carried them on the backs of 900 camels.

Pharos Lighthouse of Alexandria

Pharos Lighthouse of Alexandria

Pharos Lighthouse of Alexandria

Off the Egyptian city’s coast from Alexandria once stood the 400 foot Lighthouse of Alexandria. It was built on the island of Pharos in 305 B.C. This was during Ptolemy Soter’s rule. Sostratus of Cnidus is the designer. The Lighthouse was considered the tallest structure ever built for many centuries, even after the Romans made it into an actual lighthouse using reflecting mirrors. Sixteen centuries later, two earthquakes damaged it and in 1480 Qaitbay (the Sultan of Egypt) brought it down and erected a medieval fort there instead.

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